GIRLS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS: 12 AWESOME TITLES THAT EVERY WOMAN SHOULD READ

Superhero movies are taking over our both the big screen and small and after seeing The Avengers, Jessica Jones, the new X-Men franchise and Deadpool to name a few, you kind of want to check out the comics and graphic novels they were based off of.

However, entering the world of comics for the first time can be a weird, convoluted and sexist and bizarre place. Even with the New 52 reboot, some stories still become a convoluted mess with endless tie ins, seeing your favourite heroines from the tv shows turned into badly written fap material (poor Starfire), and we have cases such as Frank Cho throwing a hissy fit because Greg Rucka (an amazing writer) told him to alter his cover design to make it less sexualised. However, the comic book industry has gotten a lot better, and there are a lot of really great comics and graphic novels out there which treat women with respect and are accessible to new readers.

12. OLYMPIANS- by George O’Connor

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If you’re interested in Greek Myth than this is a great start. It’s fun, clever and provides a very faithful and thoughtful look into the original mythology of the Olympians. This is the series that transforms both Hera and Aphrodite into interesting, nuanced characters instead of the two dimensional hateful bitches they’re normally portrayed as. My reviews of his take on Hera, Aphrodite, Apollo, and Hades, Demeter and Persephone can be found by following the links.

11. Batwoman Elegy

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Isn’t it ironic that a character created to be Batman’s beard became one of comic’s most prominent lesbians? Yeah, Kathy Kane was a silver age creation when distaff counterparts were all the rage, and Kathy Kane along with Bat-girl – no, not that Batgirl, we’ll get to her later- her whole schtick was that she was obsessively in love with Batman. It is believed in order to disprove rumors that he’s gay with Robin. And FYI, her edition makes things so much gloriously worse- just look how miserable Batman is at the prospect of kissing an actual female!

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I love you Silver Age, you never fail to make me laugh

She eventually got retconned out of existence for being ‘too silly’ (presumably along with alien killer cactuses, Rainbow Batman and Batbaby- yes, Batman got turned into a four year old and attacked people on a rocking horse. That happened). However, she was brought back and reimagined as a proud lesbian for the New 52. In this version, she was kicked out of the army under Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and wandered around aimlessly, becoming a party girl to forget her problems. She eventually decided to sort her life out and serve her country by taking up the cowl. Colonel Kane her father supported her in her goal and got her years of specialised training with the best of the best, and turned her into a force to be reckoned with.

Greg Rucka is amazing at writing women, and J.H. William’s artwork is divine. Because the whole point of the New 52 was to reboot the comic cannon and make it accessible to new readers (whether it worked or fell flat on its stupid face is debatable), there’s no long backstory you need to know to understand it. Batwoman was my first ever comic book. The reason it’s not ranked higher is because- well, after the opening, the comic does go to really weird places, including having her fight this banshee creature and being assisted by a B-movie werewolf. It’s story telling often becomes shakey, but Batwoman herself is a great character.

10. Batgirl and Robin Year One

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Barbara Gordon is the iconic Batgirl and yet it’s quite difficult to find any comics centring around her pre- New 52 reboot. Here is a chance to read a modernization of the character’s routes before it all got messed up with The Killing Joke. In this, Barbara Gordon is a young woman living in a sexist time who wants to join the police force but is barred due to discrimination thanks to her gender and height. Defying everyone’s expectations of her, she takes up the cowl. Even Batman and Robin underestimate her at first, but she proves herself a valuable asset and her training begins.

Because the whole point of this is an origin story, there’s no need to have any prior knowledge of the Batman universe to understand that. Plus, it also stars a young Dick Grayson, and we all know that he’s always very popular with the ladies.

9. V for Vendetta

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No doubt you’ve seen the movie and know how strong Evey is. Well, the graphic novel is just as good as the film, if not better, and is thought provoking and worth checking out. Alan Moore has a very- spotty- record with female writing, what with humiliating and putting Babsy in a wheelchair and having his female characters constantly threatened with sexual assault (not to mention often pairing them with much older men), and both are true here, but here Evey goes through one of the most compelling character arcs in all of comic books, changing from a frightened victim to revolutionary who carries on what V began.

8. Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur

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This is definitely one for younger audiences, but it’s fun and there’s definately something for older audiences. Lunella is very rare in that she’s a POC heading her own comic book, and she’s a black girl genius. Moreover, she’s a great character and her struggle with being gifted and the iscolation it brings is really engaging. For more of a discussion of it, I’ve reviewed the first issue here.

7. Lumberjanes

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I heard a lot about Lumberjanes- that it has the great art from the artist who wrote for Adventure Time. Because of the title and the fact it was essentially about a group of girl scouts, I was skeptical. Whenever we read about stories trying to change the way women are portrayed, they inevitably seem to be slice of slice focusing on smaller issues about firendship, coming of age, when sod it- I just want heroines beating the crap out of people and saving the world!

But in spite of that, I was pleasantly surprised. This is that this is a good old school fantasy adventure. It’s fast paced, with a mystery to solve and a whole array of magical creatures they have to defeat. It’s a bit sweet and for a younger audience, sure, but it’s still incredibly fun.

6. SAGA- Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

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This is definately one of the most engaging series I’ve ever read and actually had me screaming ‘NOO!!’ Every time a chapter ended and breathed a sigh of relief when I realized it hadn’t. This award winning series is a Romeo and Juliet in space about a couple from two sides of a conflict who have a baby and are on the run from both sides. It’s from the man who wrote Y: The Last Man, and has a plethora of well written females.  Not only that, but it’s bad shit insane and manages to switch between being dark and funny

Even though it’s about a horned man, a winged lady and involves humanoid robots with tv heads which breed like normal humans, it also has one of the most realistic romances I’ve seen in a long time. It doesn’t start with the meet cute, but after they’ve had a kid, and they bicker and compromise like real couples.

Again, there’s a lot of diversity in terms of race, with the female lead and Gwendolyn both being women of colour.

 

5.Batgirl- Silent Knight (Cass Cain run)

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The erasure of Cassy Cain’s run as Bat Girl is one of the casualties of the New 52 reboot, but her series is pretty cool. Not only is she a young Asian superheroine who’s non sexualised, but she’s a complete badass who’s proficient in martial arts and an unstoppable fighting machine.

She was raised to be a warrior, but never taught to be a woman. In place of language she got taught to read ‘body language’- people’s movements in combat, and as such can’t speak. Jurie’s out whether this is the coolest or the dumbest idea ever.

4. MONSTRESS- MARJORIE LIU

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3.Rat Queens

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This is one of the most enjoyable series I’ve come across. I’ve reviewed it here, but essentially it involves a group of cool female friends who’s friendship feels authentic . I love the snarky humour and it’s utterly bombastic, plus the fight sequences are AMAZING.

Not only that, put it has a pretty diverse range of characters, with a lesbian in the main cast, multiple people of colour and one of the rare trans women action leads whom is looking likely to become more prominent. Afterall, who wouldn’t want to read out a badass transgender Orc woman who can annihilate everything in her path.

2. The Batgirl Of Burnside

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I could have put Gail Simone’s run here- and that is definately worth reading- but it was diminished by production issues, its continuous insistence of bringing the Joker in for angst but never allowing Barbara to defeat him, and tie ins to the Death In The Family event which made this series incoherent.

The Batgirl Of Burnside, however, is a great series that is everything New 52 should have been: it really gives her an identity that’s far more than ‘Batman/ Robin’s distaff knock off’, a distinctive world, a great cast of characters and its great solid fun.

The art is gorgeous, and Barbara’s a non sexualised, highly realistic young woman who lives a normal daily life which involves worrying about her Grad project, going on dates, using social media and hanging out with friends. Also, this series has the first trans same sex wedding in comics, which is a nice bonus.

With ‘Batgirl and The Birds Of Prey’ becoming a series, maybe Batgirl will become a spin off more akin to Angel, Xena and The Bionic Woman, a force in her own right and more than just Batman’s distaff. For a more detailed review, please click here.

1.Ms Marvel

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Carol Danvers (the original Ms Marvel, who’s now become Captain Marvel) is another great choice, but I had to go with the Kamala Khan version. I was torn between putting her and Batgirl at number one, but as much as I love Babsy, she is still a distaff counterpart, and I think Kamala might be a slightly better character- I like her doofiness, how much of a geek she is and how she struggles with her relationships with her parents.

Everything about this is great. I love how Kamala started off as a geek idolising the Avengers. The way her Muslim heritage is brought into it is done in a very nuanced, fun and interesting way- showing that Muslims aren’t a monolith, and it deals with Kamala’s frustrations with the restrictions placed on her compared with her peers.

ALSO WORTH CHECKING OUT/ HONORABLE MENTIONS

Spider Gwen is an alternate version of Spiderman where Gwen was bitten instead of Peter Parker- which involves our heroine . Greg Rucka is always great at writing women, and his run on Wonder Woman Rebirth should be promising. Nightwing is a male lead series which has a female audience in mind, as he is a strong, smart more vulnerable young man who is striking out on his own after being in Batman’s shadow, and is the hottest guy in comics; Deadpool isn’t great on women, but his series is every bit as hilarious as the movie and no Marvel knowledge is required. Plus, he became a pirate once for the hell of it- and yes, it was every bit as awesome as it sounds. Persepolis and Bitch Planet are known to be great as well, and as they are their own self contained stories, no prior knowledge is needed (although in the case of Bitch Planet, I personally prefer my feminism more incidental to the story, and build into the world and character writing, rather than being the whole point of the story). Plus, Riri Williams, a genius black girl with become Ironheart in the new Iron man series.

Ghost In The Shell- Should We Still Support It In Spite Of It’s Race Controversy

 

Ghost in The Shell- one of the most enduring franchises in Anime history, spawning the superb movie (which everyone should watch) and the great anime series (and its even bettwe sequel 2nd GIG). Now finally, a new generation will have a chance to become aquainted with an excellent franchise.

Well, it’s hard to tell so far but it does seem to have the cool, melancholy tone of the original film (although no CGI could match up to its beauty of course), and it definately has a Japanese cyberpunk thing going on. Motoko displays far more emotion than any of her other counterparts- including the hard to read film version and the seasoned, in control leader of the anime- but that not be a bad thing. Although I love the Major, a criticism is that she is a bit too perfect and can seem flat because she never really goes through any character arcs (for the record I love the Major). Maybe a Major with more of an emotional arc will make her more compelling as a lead.

I’m not sure how I feel about its white washing. On the one hand, it is great that we’re getting another female lead action franchise and that Ghost In The Shell- an absolutely amazing series- is being brought to a new generation. This could help the franchise assert itself in popular culture once more AND it will help increase the sales of the original series and maybe even increase interest in Asian media. But now anime (with a few exceptions like Madoka and Stein’s Gate) seems to have devolved into Harem wish fulfillment fantasy,Moe, ginormaboobs and yaoi bait, I’m not sure that’s entirely a good thing. But I digress.

However, looking at the cast it’s still pretty white. I understand the argument that Hollywood needs a big name it feels safe with to headline the movie and that’s why it chose Johansson. I don’t agree, but understand. But this shouldn’t mean that the supporting cast shouldn’t be predominatly Asian- yet Batou and almost all of the support are white. The only character who is currently named that is played by an Asian actor is Daisuke, the leader who is never really part of the action. He could risk falling into the role of promoted to obscurity (when they have a POC who’s really high up, but is so high up that they have little characterization and are not involved with any of the important action.) Or being the calm, magical Asian.

This is frustrating because even after the last Oscar fiasco, and with so few roles for Asians to prove themselves in, we have a film set in Japan which is yet again devoid of any Asians. There’s an arguement for Scarlett Johansson as the lead (being the sole female lead of one of the biggest action franchises), but not on this scale. Besides, when I see an Asian film with a bunch of white people, it really does kind of give me a bit of a weeaboo feel.

One thing that should be noted though, is that a lot of people in Japan don’t actually care that much about it being played by a white person. They seem just as bemused about the idea of a Chinese American (Lucy Liu) playing a Japanese character and appear to roll their eyes at how Hollywood it looks. This is probably to do with the fact that they grow up in Japan with their own thriving tv shows and media featuring Japanese people, so of course representation and the problem of Japanese actors being denied work is alien to them.

All in all, it’s hard to tell whether it’ll be good or bad, but I’ll see it to support the franchise, and to prove again that a female lead action franchise is not a risk at all (but bad writing a la Catwoman is). And maybe if this becomes a hit, we’ll get more like it. In the mean time, I’d like to leave us with the greatest animated sequence ever put to film, so we can remember why this franchise is so beloved:

However, I’m not Asian so it’s not my thoughts which count. If anyone else has anything to say about this please feel free to post in the comments.

REVIEW: The Batgirl Of Burnside vol 1- A great start for die hard fans and newbies alike

When I picked up this title, I was wary of what this new series would bring. I was worried about this story being taken from Gale Simone’s capable hands and put into the hands of some misogynist who doesn’t care about her character. However, I need not have worried, because not only does this series treat Barbara with respect, it also gives it a very unique identity distinct from the Big Man himself and helps put a bit of distance between Barbara and the Killing joke.

You don’t need to know anything about Barbara’s history or Gail Simone’s run to enjoy this comic, and it’s a great place to start if you’re interested in checking out a Batgirl comic for the first time.

However, here’s a quick run down of her history. If you’re not that interested, then skip straight to the section marked The Batgirl Of Burnside, where I begin the review of this book.

BARBARA GORDON: THE ADAM WEST YEARS

The Barbara Gordon incarnation of Batgirl was created during the sixties for the Adam West television show in order to increase female viewership. The character they created was Commissioner Gordon’s daughter, a strong 25 year old with a doctorate in Library sciences and was basically a genius and the picture of what the women’s rights movement looked like at the time. DC incorporated her into the comics shortly afterwards as part of the bat family.

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Feminism: proving that it’s not only the boys who can provide a brightly coloured target to distract people from Batman!

She solved crime alongside Batman and Robin, appearing in the comics but never taking center stage except for years later in Batgirl and Robin year One, where we got to see her backstory, which involved her becoming Batgirl after she was denied the chance to become a detective due to sexism in the force .All throughout she was a popular character, but eventually her character became less prominent and she was gradually phased out, ending in her retiring as Batgirl to join congress… at least a dignified end to a prominent character. And then came this….

THE KILLING JOKE

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The Killing Joke. If you know anything at all about Batgirl, you’ve heard of Alan Moore’s (V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen)  ‘The Killing Joke’. Yeah, it was a psychological piece that was not meant to be cannon and it reduced Barbara to a pawn who was humiliated, paralyzed and victimized in a power game between three men. Moore himself said that he regretted what happened, and that the editors should have reigned him more, but they were like ‘cripple the bitch.’

BARBARA GORDON: ORACLE- DOWN BUT NOT OUT

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Even sexist editors and being wheelchair bound won’t stop Barbara from fighting crime

Barbara was reduced to the wheelchair permanently (even though this takes place in a universe with magic, space aliens and characters who have come back from the dead), but fortunately, Kim Yale and John Ostrander did not agree with her treatment, and decided to make sure her character wasn’t sidelined. Thus the Oracle was born- a genius detective in a wheelchair who provided intel to other superheroes. During that time, Stephanie Brown and Cassandra Cain took up the mantle of Batgirl with varying success (Cassandra Cain’s run beginning in Silent Knight is really worth checking out).

THE NEW 52 REBOOT

But when the New 52, the reboot of the DC Universe created to appeal to new fans, they took Barbara Gordon out of the wheelchair and gave her back the Batgirl mantle. Yeah, this caused controversy as it miraculously cured one of DC’s only disabled superheroes, and (initially) removed Stephanie Brown and Asian Batgirl Cassandra Cain from the role. After Daredevil, Professor X and Hawkeye (he’s lost a lot of his hearing in the comics), Oracle is one of the most prominent disabled superheroes about- and one who doesn’t have superpowers that specifically make her disability almost irrelevant (a la Toph Bei Fong who sees with earthbending), so a lot of people were understandably upset.

Me personally, I totally understand why people are upset about this, but I’m glad to have Barbara back. In a world where people have come back from the dead, radiation is basically magic that does anything you want, we have magical cures left right and center, I don’t see why Barbara had to be permanently in the chair. I don’t see why The Killing Joke was ever cannon, as it worked better as an imaginary, psychological study of the two adversaries. Her history should never have been influenced so heavily by a comic that was never even about her, and doesn’t make Batman look great after if the last few panels of him laughing with The Joker, the man who damaged the lives of two of his most loyal crime fighting allies, and Batgirl of Burnside is a step in the right direction.

I am sad that Cass Cain almost got retconned out of history and I think it would have been good if someone else could have taken up the Oracle mantle (like how Kamala took up the Ms Marvel mantle after Carol Danvers became Captain Marvel). But I digress, and shall move on to Gail Simone’s run on the new 52.

In Gail Simone’s run, The Killing Joke is still canon (although Bab’s Oracle years happened in a very compressed timeline), and she took her out of the chair and had her finding her feet again as a superheroine, dealing with PTSD thanks to the Joker’s attack.  It was a decent run- but was held back by its links to tie in events, which made it extremely confusing for new readers, and the fact that it kept on bringing the Joker into it, but wouldn’t let her defeat him, so it felt like a weak and somewhat unsatisfying arc that was chasing its own tail.

NOW, ONTO BATGIRL OF BURNSIDE

Now finally, the Batgirl Of Burnside continues from Gail’s run and begins the process of distancing Batgirl from the Killing Joke and bringing her into her own. Ironically, this story achieves what The New 52 was trying to achieve… it keeps her vital traits, while beginning a new story which requires no prior knowledge of Barbara’s history. One of the pivotal events is Barbara Gordon losing her old costume in a fire and having to create a new one and it’s absolutely amazing. Far from the sexualized boob socks, and revealing clothes we’re used to seeing, this costume looks fantastic, practical, and also doesn’t stray too far from its iconic routes- which is where I think the attempts to redesign Wonderwoman’s outfits run into trouble. This is recognizably Batgirl, but her already great costume looks so much better.

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In fact, the whole story is stronger for the way Babs is portrayed. She’s still every bit as beautiful as she was- but she’s clearly not sexualised. She doesn’t wear clothes that no real woman wouldn’t wear, doesn’t possess those bizarre gravity defying boobs that confuse me more than some of Batman’s Silver Age plotlines;  she dresses like a normal 21 year old and she doesn’t stand in any ridiculous hip cocked boobs out pose. She has an expressive face, and all her poses convey her emotions and personality. In short, she feels more like a real person than just some bizarre sex doll.

This story is just so, so much fun. It’s drawn in a gorgeous bright, eyepopping style that helps give this world its own identity. I really think they utilized the lettering well throughout the comic- social media is a big part of Babsy’s world, and this is shown through speech bubbles; we’ll see the text pop up like an iPhone message when they’re reading a text, or we’ll see what looks like an iPhone play screen showing a song that’s playing during a car ride. All this really helps show that this world is immersed in social media and to great effect, and it really helps modernise Batgirl’s world.

And the colouring is great too. I mean, look at that sunset  below, and how bright everything is. I also love how a lot of the background panels are blank with bold colours during action scenes- it makes it look bright and energetic and kind of reminds me of the old school comics while still feeling really modern.

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The style is a lot more cartoony than  in most comics, and in this case it allows for more exaggerated facial expressions which really helps get character across. It’s a world apart from the dark, broody world of Batman, which some fans have criticized but I think works really well in this case. I mean, Batgirl isn’t Bruce Wayne. She’s an ordinary young woman who fights crime and who achieves incredible feats thanks to her determination, resourcefulness and a desire to help people regardless of the obstacles against her- not a brooding millionaire who saw his parents murdered before his eyes. She’s meant to appeal to a new audience- a young female audience- so making her adventures fun and having her deal with things like Uni, friendships, and using social media makes perfect sense.

This is what you want from comics- fun, and every moment of this comic is a riot- whether its seeing her struggle with school work, partying with her friends or fighting Anime inspired robot motorcycle riding twins. Come on, a part of everyone wants to see that, and this kind of fan, insanity is what comics can do which live action television and other mediums can’t do so easily. The brighter art style also gives it a lighter more cartoonish aesthetic, which makes all the silliness easier to swallow.

Some of it is silly- and I don’t fully buy some of it (I have a few questions about the ending, which I won’t go into due to spoilers), but its tone makes it something I can swallow more.

The one problem I- as well as a whole host of other people-  ran into was Dagger Type. Oh dear, Dagger Type.  There was a pretty fun storyline about a fake sparkly batgirl imitating the real one and taking selfies, becoming an internet celebrity, and basically causing trouble. It was fun… and then we got to the reveal, and it turned out that the fake Batgirl was a man… a psychotic, melodramatic Drag Queen/ cross dresser (it doesn’t specify which) who is the unholy union of the sissy villain and the psychotic gender bender ( think Silence Of The Lambs). Yeah, kind of a disaster and quite a slap in the face to people who are trans/ gender fluid or who are not gender conforming in some way. Especially since with Barbara’s trans lady roomie Alysia, Renee Montoya, Batwoman and Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy now confirmed to be an item, the Bat Universe is one that has been pretty LGBT friendly. Not a great move. Notice how he suddenly looks extremely deranged as soon as his gender’s revealed and goes crazy? Yeah, very Buffalo Bill.

HOWEVER– what is the most incredible part of this story is how the creators responded to this problem. They didn’t give a ‘I’m sorry you were offended this was not how this was meant to be read’ non apology, but they listened to the critique and admitted their errors in a highly sincere apology. That shows a lot of maturity and respect for their fans, and makes them a team whose work I’d still want to follow. Afterall, even the most well meaning and liberal of us can make mistakes.

The rest of the issue recovered, however. I liked the inclusion of Black Canary, and I loved the good solid fun everyone was having. Barbara has so many positive female friendships- from Black Canary, to Alysia Yeoh, to her new roommate Frankie and her Muslim colleague- that felt so natural, warm and fun, that it was enjoyable. Not only that, but the cast is so naturally diverse- from the bisexual and gay black characters, to Barbara’s Muslim coworker, who were all smart, likeable young people living their lives.

I liked how social media was incorporated- Batgirl goes on ‘Hooq’ (a form of Tinder) and there’s also a storyline about her positing her antics on social media. This is a perfect way to make her life more relatable to the younger fans its trying to appeal to, and it feels genuine and not written by some old guy trying to be ‘down wit da kidz’.

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I was also pleased that Alysia remained a character. Alysia was Barbara’s transgender roomate that appeared in the New 52, and regardless of whether fans loved or hated Gail Simone’s run, the one thing everyone could agree on was that Alysia was great. A spunky liberal activist, she was kind, capable of helping even Batgirl out of a scrape and she had the kind of genuine friendship with Barbara that is unusual in comics- not only that, but she was one of comics rare transgender characters and her transgender status wasn’t what defined her. She’s not especially prominent here, but she hasn’t been canned and that’s a relief.

It also teased the idea of her new roomate, Frankie, becoming the new Oracle- which would be amazing: it would allow Barbara to return to the cowl, and we could keep a strong role model for disabled reader. This time one who isn’t defined by a mysogynistic misstep by editors who don’t give a damn about the character.

VERDICT: Batgirl is great fun and what the New 52 run should have been: new, with a distinct identity and no comic history knowledge required for new readers.

RATING: 5 smackdowns from Babs/ 5

 

WHY X-MEN ORIGINS DID RIGHT BY DEADPOOL

I’m not going to bother reviewing Deadpool aka Hollywood’s apology letter for X-men Origins. You know it’s awesome. You don’t need me to  tell you what everyone else on the internet is screaming.

Deadpool is box office gold and it has excited Hollywood executives sitting around the table desperately trying to figure out the answer to the question: ‘what is it that made everyone go insane over Deadpool?’ Deadpool is very, very good, but as we know being very, very good doesn’t necessarily make you popular. Well, I have a few theories about why everyone loves Deadpool so much and it begins with the film that made him the man he is today: X- men Origins.

X-Men Origins didn’t ruin him; it made him (No. I’m not joking)

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As much as I hate that whitewashed film Avatar the Last Airbender, I never would have seen the cartoon if I hadn’t heard about it during the Internet backlash

Seriously. If X-men Origins didn’t do such an appalling job with his character, I don’t think Deadpool would have been anticipated with anywhere near the same level of hype. In fact, I’m not even sure a film about Deadpool would have been made in the first place. Let me explain:

Before X- Men Origins, almost nobody outside hardcore comic book fans had heard of Deadpool. A lot of us knew of Storm, Wolverine, Rogue, Cyclops, Xavier, Magneto and the Juggernaut (bitch) from the 90s cartoon series, but Deadpool? This  fourth wall breaking joker wasn’t a household name like the others. But Origins changed all that.

If X-men Origins had just reduced him to a cameo like they did with Gambit, sure, there would have been some seething tweets about this being a ‘wasted opportunity’; but there wouldn’t have been a huge outrage and we probably wouldn’t have thought much about him. However, because of how dreadful his portrayal was on every level, the entire comic book  fandom was up in arms. There was article after article on every geek culture website raging about what had been done to Deadpool. That’s when it began. Suddenly, everybody started hearing about this Deadpool; how they ruined his character, how he was the most hilarious character in the Marvel universe and they sewed his lips shut. And the more we heard, the more we wanted to find out more about him. Suddenly, we were pissed off about the treatment of Deadpool too. Suddenly we wanted to see this superhero given his due. And Hollywood knew that. They knew that superhero films were extremely popular; they knew that if they got talented people behind it they had a ready made fan-base. And that’s what gave Wade his catalyst to fame.

He’s a game changer in the same way Batman was

Part of what made Batman Begins so successful was that he was Batman as we had never seen him before. Up until then, the common image of an onscreen Batman was the image of Adam West in his camp attire and later Del Boy and Rodney running through the streets in their costumes; and Batman forever which was just… punishing.

But Nolan approached his film differently. He took the character seriously. He turned Batman into a dark, jaded anti hero who was the last line of defense against a corruption threatening to drag a city into darkness. We had a real battle against good and evil; we had real stakes. And we were loved every moment of it. Soon, the more serious tone became the new normal for superhero films.

James Gunn, director of Guardians of the Galaxy,

“The film has a self-deprecating tone that’s riotous. It’s never been done before. It’s poking fun at Marvel. That label takes itself so seriously, can you imagine them making fun of themselves in a movie? They’d rather stab themselves.”- James Gunn

I’d agree to an extent. Sure, you got a lot of self depracating jokes in previous superhero films (Peter Parker trying to tell Gwen Stacey’s father about the lizard man in The Amazing Spider-Man and being asked ‘do I look like the mayor of Tokyo?’). But not like this; there’s nothing Deadpool won’t mock.

He gets our banter

“I think your crazy matches my crazy.”

How many of us have said something like that to our spouse or best mate? Exactly, all of us. And that’s the beauty of Deadpool.

His acerbic, irreverent sense of humor is our sense of humour. His twisted one liners are like the ones we tell each other on a Friday night when we’re pissed with our friends. That scene with the taxi driver and his romantic rival locked in the boot was so bad, so sick, but so so good because that’s exactly the kind of shit we say with or mates. We love him because he’s hilarious; we love him even more because he’s real as well.

It was just pure entertainment

That is the crux of the matter- while there are a lot of factors that made Deadpool, The Avengers, Batman Begins popular, the elephant in the room is that all of these films were good. Everything about this film was just so perfect and so fun. The jokes had me banging my fist against the chair. The fight scenes were slick and creative and a joy to watch. The characters were likable. Ryan Reynolds was amazing. Vanessa was great (it was wonderful to see a sex worker who wasn’t portrayed as a slut or a victim, but a real person). Collossus was so corny and over the top that he made the perfect foil to Deadpool. Francis was just so real, and so nasty that even Deadpool’s humor  couldn’t undermine the awfulness of his actions.

Everything about it made it a pure joy to watch and that’s what keeps people coming back. If Hollywood can learn any lesson from Deadpool, it should be that if it wants to make money than it should keep on putting its money into good quality people making good quality movies.

Best of the Best: Superheroines

Superheroes aren’t just for nerdy comic fans any-more (and as a nerdy anime otaku myself, I use the term with nothing but affection). With dozens of Superhero films coming out this year, they’re more popular now than ever. In this list I’m going to look at the most badass, complex and interesting heroines I’ve come across in comics so far.
Continue reading Best of the Best: Superheroines

Jessica Jones, Supergirl, Suicide Squad and Wonderwoman: could this be the golden age of the superheroine?

There has never been a road so rocky and dripping with blood as the path to a superheroine adaption which doesn’t suck balls. With  Supergirl (the original film), Elektra, Tank Girl and Barbed Wire– we saw box office bomb after box office bomb. It reached its ultimate low point with Catwoman, a film so bad, so devoid of good ideas that it destroyed the possibility of a female lead superhero film for years. I mean, for heaven’s sake-It had Halle Berry running around in a skin tight Dominatrix outfit; all it needed to do was not be so dreadful that it made you want to gouge your eyes out, and it would have been box office gold…How did they manage to turn that into a disaster? Oh, yeah- It threw all of Selina’s comic history out of the window for evil beauty companies and CGI cats with mystical resurrection powers. That’s how. Continue reading Jessica Jones, Supergirl, Suicide Squad and Wonderwoman: could this be the golden age of the superheroine?

BOOK REVIEW: The Astounding Antagonists-by Rafael Chandler

A cryogenic drug lord, a hellbound jewel thief, a metallokinetic communist, a church-burning psychopath, and a megalomaniacal inventor: they are the Antagonists, the most dangerous supervillains alive.

Pursued by violent superheroes and high-tech billionaire vigilantes, these villains have assembled in order to pull off the perfect crime. There’s just one catch: if they succeed, they might just save the world.

When a lot of people hear the word ‘diversity’, they think of politically correct tokens created to pander to ‘Tumblr Social Justice Warriors’; a tale where good storytelling is sacrificed for ‘an agenda’; a world where everything is so squeaky clean and so sanitised that it no longer reflects real life, but tells us what real life should look like if we could all start being more politically correct.Astounding Antagonists demonstrates why a diverse cast creates a great story. This is an ensemble piece with a large cast so unique, so different from each other and all so loveable flawed in their own way that every single person who appears is memorable.

We have Motley (or Criminal Comedienne), a 40 year old Mexican woman who’s arguably this world’s answer to Harley Quinn. If Harley Quinn had a better taste in men and was less, you know, certifiably axe crazy. Okay, so she’s basically Harley Quinn In that she’s clown themed and funny. After spending half her life fighting to keep herself above the poverty line, Motley’s a pragmatist who’s used to putting herself first. She’s got a lot of compassion- she uses the proceeds of her theft to keep a woman’s shelter financially in the black- but again she’s no robin hood and she isn’t just forced into theft out of circumstance. She’s a thief because she loves the thrill of the chase and her self-centred ways have caused her to hurt the people closest to her. She is a great character because while the other superheroes and villains have powers like ice control, super strength or the ability to manipulate metal, Motley can jump really high. She’s outmatched by everyone around her and knows it, but she still uses her smarts and pragmatism to pull through.

Then we have Dr Agon, a black gay man who’s the mad scientist and driving force behind the story. He is a rebel who hates the way the superheroes and their big companies have unquestioned control of society. He’s brilliant, but is completely socially awkward and seems to lack empathy. His drive is so intense that although he wants to have a happy life with his husband Gideon, he knows he can’t because his ambition is so overwhelming that he will continue down his path even though he knows it will one day destroy him, and the people he loves around him.

Then there’s Helen, a telepathic alien pacifist who has a touching back story. And Danjiro Tamaki, a young extremely idealistic college graduate whose naiveté makes his world perception a little unrealistic.

These are just a few of the great characters in this book- and each one of them is brilliantly fleshed out and every single one has character development. But it isn’t just the characters that are good; it’s the story and world. As you’d expect from a story with supervillains as the protagonists, it’s a deconstruction of the superhero genre. Or, even more specifically, the DC Universe (okay, we have a version of The Fantastic Four in there too, so a little Marvel). In the DC Universe, your Iron Mans and your Batmans are powerful billionaires. The heroes also tend to be hypernationalistic Americans (Black Panther being the only exception I can think of) with Wonder Woman and her stars and stripes leotard, and Captain America…well, being freaking Captain America. And we all know what super wealthy, super nationalistic Americans can be like in real life. This world takes these traits to their logical conclusion. This is what would happen if a wealthy all- American (lets face it, the kind of people who Donald Trump appeals to) were the ones with superpowers.

They hoard jealousy safe guard the ability to create superheroes to ensure that no one other than Americans (whom they approve of) are able to become superheroes. They use their powers to interfere in international affairs and cause grievous harm abroad.

One of my favourite sub plots- which I’m going to delve into in a lot more detail in another post- is the subplot where it brutally attacks the crushing beauty standards that are placed in women in comic books- and the media. You see in every aspect how the male Superheroes treat the women on their various teams. They’re always seen as a piece of meat, chosen for their looks for and foremost. Even the hero Princess- (a female version of Fantastic Four’s ‘The Thing’) is clearly extremely deadly and a fantastic brawler, she’s first and foremost treated like a sex object; she constantly loves being the centre of the moment, but fears when she will lose her beauty, when in spite of all she’s accomplished she will become no one. Especially in the wake of the nonsense surrounding Carrie Fisher for daring to have aged in her 30 years since return of the Jedi, this is all extremely poignant.

The ending is so good as well. It was wonderfully seeing how every single member of the cast member changed, every single one of them had learnt and grown from where they were to begin with. I cannot recommend this book and would urge anyone reading this review to go out and read it.

 

RATING: 5 levels of Badass / 5